Slimming Oo Pu-Erh

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Sale Price: Out of stock. Discontinued
Out of stock
Brand: Loose Leaf 1/4 lb -2.2 lb

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A refreshing blend of Young Pu-Erh and Organic Ti Kuan Yin Slimming Oolong plus mint, apple pieces and sweet strawberry pieces. Treat yourself and give your weight loss program an added boost.

ORGANIC SLIMMING OOLONG TI KUAN YIN
(Organic Oolong Tea)
Country of Origin: China
Region: Fujian Province
Shipping Port: Fuzhou
Grade: Ti Kuan Yin
Altitude: 2500 ft. above sea level
Manufacture Type: Oolong
Cup Characteristics: Floral-like orchid notes with a smooth and haunting finish. This is an excellent vintage Ti Kuan Yin which has no calories when consumed without milk or sugar.
Infusion: Pale green yellow liquor, tending slightly amber
Ingredients: Luxury organic Oolong tea
Certified Organic by QMI Organic Inc.
Certificate #: 150 - 2008 Information:
According to international sales figures, Ti Kuan Yin is the most popular Chinese Oolong worldwide. Like all Oolongs, Ti Kuan Yin is semi-fermented, meaning it falls roughly at the mid way point between black and green teas in terms of color, flavor, and intensity. Unlike other Oolongs, the process of making Ti Kuan Yin involves a longer baking, or drying process. As well, the raw leaf used to produce the tea is grown on a sub-varietal of Camellia sinensis. According to Fujian legend, this varietal was discovered by divine guidance hence its name, which loosely translates as Goddess of Mercy.
In the Buddhist tradition, the Goddess of Mercy, Guanyin, was known as a Boddhisatva, an enlightened being that has decided to stay on earth to bring others to enlightenment. Statues erected in her honor dot the Chinese countryside. As the ancient story goes, a tea maker in Fujian (where the style of tea originated) passed a statue beside a Buddhist temple that had been neglected and was overgrown with weeds. Not having enough money to fix the temple, he decided that at the very least he could afford to burn incense at the foot of the statue and sweep the yard on a regular basis. After a few months of diligently making this simple offering to Guanyin, the Goddess appeared in a dream to thank him. She told him about a cave near his home that contained a very special tea plant no one had ever seen before. The next day the man searched the cave and sure enough, found the shoot of a unique tea bush. He cultivated the bush, and produced a crop of tea that he named after the goddess. Thanks to her benevolence, the tea maker sold more tea than ever before and went on to live a healthy and prosperous life.
As good as Ti Kuan Yin was, and still is, for increasing sales figures, Eastern research appears to indicate that it is equally as good for reducing another type of figure. We like to believe that it is due to the benevolence of the Goddess of Mercy that this tea is sometimes referred to as “slimming” oolong. (In her mercy she’s made it easier for people to shed a few pounds!) Although Western research is still inconclusive, in China, Ti Kuan Yin is drunk with meals to help foster a feeling of satisfaction without the need to gorge oneself on the pleasures of the table. The cup is full bodied with deep almost winy notes that help fill the belly. Whatever you choose to believe about this tea two things are certain: one, it’s a delicately profound cup and two, it’s great with meals, particularly spicy ones. Pour a cup and give thanks to the Goddess of Mercy.
Hot tea brewing method: Oolongs teas are best enjoyed when the leaves are briefly infused with hot water, which is then poured off. The tea is then reinfused and tea is poured to the lucky guests after about 1 minute. The leaves may be reinfused several times, with each resulting infusion yielding different liquor from the proceeding cup.

YOUNG PU-ERH
(China Special Black Tea)
Country of Origin: China
Region: Yunnan Province
Shipping Port: Hong Kong
Grade: Pu-erh 1 year vintage
Altitude: 1500 – 4100 ft. above sea level
Manufacture Type: Special Pu-Erh process
Cup Characteristics: Musty, earthy character sometimes described as old or elemental.
Infusion: Dull, black
Ingredients: Luxury Pu-erh tea
Information:
This tea is famed for its medicinal properties. The leaves come from the Yunnan Dayeh variety of tea tree - which is purported to be closely related to the original tea tree of pre-glacial times. During the 1200’s the troops of Kubla Khan are said to have introduced Pu-erh to the rest of China for its medicinal value. Pu-erh is often taken for relief of indigestion and dysentery but has also been reported very useful in the reduction of cholesterol. Kunming Medical College claims that pu-erh can lower cholesterol by 17 percent and triglycerides by 22 percent. They may have been slightly over zealous about the properties of pu-erh as a University in Berlin and another in France found that the claim was perhaps overstated. A study in Japan indicated that all tea lowered cholesterol and that pu-erh was more effective than green tea. Other followers of ‘Chinese tea for health’ report that pu-erh can; “cut the grease, help digestion, promote body fluid secretion, quench the thirst, invigorate the spleen and dispel alcoholic toxins” Whether pu-erh is effective or not for the various claims that researchers and tea drinkers make has not been firmly established; what is certain is that pu-erh is rather unusual and has properties many other teas do not share.
The method of production is: The tealeaves are picked, rolled, withered in the hot sun, after which they are steamed and pressed into cakes. This pu-erh is broken up out of the cakes to make it easier to deal with. The steaming process generates some moisture and when compressed (without drying) into the cakes, in the course of time the tea takes on a musty and earthy character. Pu-erh that gets somewhat moldy before it naturally dries is considered the best. Pu-erh is then stored for years. As with wine, young pu-erh is considered the least valuable whereas pu-erh 5 years or older is more highly prized. Interestingly the taste of pu-erh becomes more mellow with age and perhaps more acceptable to the western palate.
The taste has been described as mellow, however those not accustomed to it might not enjoy the ‘old’ character. For others though, this flavor will add to its aura of wonder and seem fitting in a tea prized for its medicinal properties. Some consumers have recommended that pu-erh be blended with chrysanthemum florets to make the taste more acceptable. In fact this blend can be ordered in tea houses in southern China and Hong Kong.

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